Sunday, July 20, 2014

Global Family Reunion

Have you heard? This is not your mama's reunion.

The writer, AJ Jacobs, who is with Esquire and is  a best-selling author, wants to bring together as many "cousins" as possible for a massive reunion to be held on the site of the 1964 World's Fair in New York City next June 6. Admission is $20 but all proceeds will go to Alzheimer's research. For more information, visit the Reunion website http://goo.gl/opak9E.  Be sure to view the video. ABCnews has more coverage at http://goo.gl/sFM3VI.

In order to find all the cousins, there is an effort underway by a team consisting of names we all know: Wikitree, Geni (owned by MyHeritage), Family Tree DNA, 23andMe. Each of us can go online today to determine if we qualify for the reunion. It's based on "degrees of separation" between you and either AJ or his wife.

Notice there is one flaw in the mix (for purists like me): When AJ talks about "family," he is including in-laws. We all know that this is not acceptable to genealogists, or geneticists, but for this fun project, I'm willing to bend the rules.

And I already have. I've signed up for the Reunion and I'm number 100 in Wikitree's Global Reunion Project with 27 degrees of separation from AJ on two lines. The actual genetic relationships go through siblings in the lines, however, so neither  "cousinship" is accurate in genealogical terms.

I hope you will join me!

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Understanding genetic genealogy

We all have questions:  Why should I care about DNA testing? How do I choose the right tests? What can I learn? What are the limitations and pitfalls? How do I interpret the results? How do I apply them to my own genealogy?... and more.  The information is out there in blogs, tutorials, books. FamilyTreeDNA itself  has a wonderful library of videos, FAQs, reports, etc. ISOGG has a wealth of information, including a wiki. Many of the bloggers I list as suggested links on this page have done and continue to do a wonderful job explaining the intricacies of DNA testing. Now Blaine Bettinger has launched the first how-to multimedia guide for genetic genealogy.

Spend the summer learning more about how you can advance your own genealogy through DNA testing. Happy ancestor tree climbing!

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

More about transfers

This message from Family Tree DNA discusses your options. I will add www.mitosearch.org for the transfer of  mtDNA data. Ysearch.org and mitosearch.org are simply databases; they do not allow you to buy additional tests, but they do allow you to match with others who have uploaded their data. Both are public sites that are sponsored by Family Tree DNA and accept DNA results from other companies as a public service. When you transfer to either of these databases, be sure to pay close attention to choosing the company you are transferring from because the data is formatted differently by different companies and your results will only be comparable if they are entered properly.

From Family Tree DNA:

On Thursday, Ancestry.com™ announced that they will no longer sell Y-DNA  tests.  Additionally, the results from past Y-DNA tests will no longer be available after September 5, 2014.
 
YSearch and Family Tree DNA are committed to supporting this valuable genealogical test today and in the future.  We strongly encourage you to tell your friends and family to transfer their Y-DNA data to Family Tree DNA or YSearch before it's too late.   

If you haven't already tested with Family Tree DNA, you can transfer your Y-DNA results to get:
  • Access to group projects (available to all transfers)
  • Find Y-DNA matches using FTDNA's huge database (requries  a transfer + marker upgrade)
  • Access to the new Y-DNA haplotree (requries a transfer + marker upgrade)
  • Access to superior customer support (available to all transfers)
Click here to transfer your Y-DNA results to Family Tree DNA now!

The Y-DNA transfer options are listed below:

$19
Y-DNA 33 Marker Transfer
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • No matches or haplogroup predictions
$19
Y-DNA 46 Marker Transfer
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • No matches or haplogroup predictions
$58
Y-DNA 33 Transfer +
25 Marker Upgrade*
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • Y-DNA matches
  • Haplogroup predictions
  • Additional standard FTDNA Y-DNA features
$58
Y-DNA 46 Transfer +
37 Marker Upgrade*
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • Y-DNA matches
  • Haplogroup predictions
  • Additional standard FTDNA Y-DNA features

* Those unable to provide samples can still be upgraded to receive 12 marker matches for Y-DNA33 and 25 marker matches for their Y-DNA46

 
Thank you,
YSearch & Family Tree DNA

Monday, June 9, 2014

Sale on DNA Testing June 9 to Jun 17

Family Tree DNA has announced its Father's Day sale:

$79 for Family Finder (autosomal test for finding cousins)

$595 for Big Y (SNP testing that drills down find all the SNPs that are present in your Y-DNA and, therefore, your position on the Tree of Mankind)

For details, please see http://dna-explained.com/2014/06/09/big-y-and-family-finder-sale-plus-100-coupon-for-big-y/.

Saturday, June 7, 2014

How to download DNA results from Ancestry.com

To transfer your test results, you must download them from Ancestry to your own computer, then upload the file(s) you downloaded from your computer to Family Tree DNA (after purchasing the transfer test you wish).


To download Y-DNA results:
1. Log into Ancestry.com.
2. Point to DNA in the top menu bar, click on Y-DNA and mtDNA Tests.
3. Scroll down to Download all Y-DNA results and click.
4. Note where the file is saved in your computer. You will upload that file later to FTDNA.


You cannot transfer mtDNA results because of compatibility issues, but you may want to download and keep the mtDNA file anyway for later use.


To download Y-DNA and/or mtDNA matches:
1. Log into Ancestry.com
2. Point to DNA in the top menu bar, click on Y-DNA and mtDNA Tests.
3. Choose Paternal lineage (Y-DNA), then Matches.
4. Click on Download Matches.
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for Maternal lineage (mtDNA).
6. The downloaded files will be in .csv format, readable by Excel or Google Sheets.


To download autosomal* results:
1. Log into Ancestry. com.
2. Point to DNA in the top menu bar, click on Your DNA Home page.
3. Click on Settings.
4. Find the Actions block on the right. Click Get Started.
5. Enter your email address and follow the instructions.
6. Once you have downloaded your raw data, note where the file is saved in your computer. You will upload that file later to FTDNA (and/or to www.gedmatch.com if you wish).


To download autosomal matches:
1. Install the Chrome browser in your computer, if you do not already have it.
2. Click on the icon in the top bar with three horizontal lines (far right).
3. Click on Tools\Extensions\Ancestry DNA Helper.
4. Click on Visit Website for instructions on how to use this tool.

*For more instructions about working with autosomal results, see my blog http://genealogyanddna.blogspot.com/2014/04/putting-family-finder-to-work-for-you.html.

Friday, June 6, 2014

Warning! If you have tested with Ancestry.com....

The following announcement is from Family Tree DNA, the first and largest company offering genetic testing for genealogy. This highly reputable company offers the largest array of tests and is committed to supporting genealogy, first and foremost. For a comparison of companies and their offerings, please see the ISOGG website: www.isogg.com. If you have questions, please comment below or write to me directly.

From Family Tree DNA to Project Administrators:


On Thursday, Ancestry.com™ announced that they will no longer sell Y-DNA and mtDNA tests.  Additionally, the results from past Y-DNA and mtDNA tests will no longer be available after September 5, 2014.
There are no guarantee on what the future holds for Ancestry.com's™ autosomal DNA offering so we strongly recommend that you tell people that tested with Ancestry.com™ to transfer their Y-DNA and Autosomal DNA to Family Tree DNA where our main focus is genetic genealogy. mtDNA is not transferable because of compatibility issues.
Family Tree DNA is committed to supporting these valuable genealogical tests today and in the future.  You should encourage anyone who has tested with Ancestry.com™ to transfer their record to Family Tree DNA as soon as possible.
The Y-DNA and Autosomal DNA transfer options are listed below:

$19
Y-DNA 33 Marker Transfer
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • No matches or haplogroup predictions
$19
Y-DNA 46 Marker Transfer
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • No matches or haplogroup predictions
$58
Y-DNA 33 Transfer +
25 Marker Upgrade*
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • Y-DNA matches
  • Haplogroup predictions
  • Additional standard FTDNA Y-DNA features
$58
Y-DNA 46 Transfer +
37 Marker Upgrade*
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • Y-DNA matches
  • Haplogroup predictions
  • Additional standard FTDNA Y-DNA features

$69
  • Store your results on FTDNA.
  • Participate in group projects.
  • Family Finder matches
  • Additional standard Family Finder features

* Those unable to provide samples can still be upgraded to receive 12 marker matches for Y-DNA33 and 25 marker matches for their Y-DNA46

Thursday, June 5, 2014

Important news from Ancestry.com today

If you have tested Y-DNA or mtDNA at Ancestry.com, there is an important announcement from them today. You will no longer be able to access your results or matches. Transfer the results to Family Tree DNA! For details, see http://www.yourgeneticgenealogist.com/2014/06/ancestrycom-officially-retires-y-dna.html.